Examining the Relationship Between Attention, Perception, and Performance

Allison Henry Butler University, Caitlin Klare Butler University, Maggie Considine Butler University, Meghan Riordan Butler University, Nadja Feathers-Hines Butler University
Faculty Sponsor(s): Brian Day Butler University
Previous research illustrates that athletes who performed better estimate a target’s size as larger in comparison to players who performed poorly (Lee et al., 2011). Lee et al. (2012) suggest that improving coordination and control when acting amplifies an actor’s ability to judge proximal size. We investigated this by manipulating attention, which impacts an actor’s ability to coordinate and control their action, and assessing the impact that focus of attention has on the relationship between perception and performance. 26 undergraduate students participated in this study, where participants were asked to perform a golf putting task. The primary manipulation involved changing where and to what participants were attending. A 3 (attention condition: hole, ball, body) x 3 (favorite condition: hole, ball, body) mixed-design ANOVA on the number of putts made revealed a significant interaction between attention and preferred condition predicting made putts [F(4, 46) = 5.97, p < .01, η2p = .34]. Another 3 (attention condition: hole, ball, body) x 3 (favorite condition: hole, ball, body) mixed-design ANOVA on the distance each putt rested from the hole revealed a significant interaction between attention and preferred condition predicting error distance [F(4, 46) = 4.57, p < .01, η2p = .28]. Our results suggest that the parts of the environment being consciously attended to impact one’s perceived preferences and their ability to perform successful actions. We believe perceived preference comes from a combination of increased coordination and control via directed attention of an actor on any task.
Psychology
Oral Presentation

When & Where

02:15 PM
Gallahue Hall 106