Examining the Northern Triangle Migration Crisis: An Analysis of Government and NGO Solutions

Sarah Elam Butler University
Faculty Sponsor(s): Paul Hanson Butler University
The right not to have to migrate is a human right that cannot be ignored. In the context of El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala, a group of Central American countries known as the Northern Triangle, migration is widespread and a point of contention with political debates and government shutdowns focusing on the issue. The reality is that violence, social exclusion, institutional incapacity, and corruption drive people to migrate, meaning that migration is not always a choice, rather a means for survival. The right not to have to migrate is being violated by these push factors. Migration should be a choice not a necessity. As such, various actors including governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have developed approaches to solve the root causes of migration in the Northern Triangle. This paper first establishes the right not to have to migrate as a right that should be internationally recognized and then explores the effectiveness of the Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI), a United States’ government approach, and Save the Children, an NGO approach, to determine whether government or NGO approaches are more effective at upholding this right. Using secondary sources to conduct a case study, I evaluate effectiveness based on motivation, public perception, and policy implementation. Before examining the case study, this paper provides context on the issue as well as background information on the effectiveness of governments and non-governmental organizations and establishes the right not to have to migrate as a right that should be internationally accepted.
Political Science
Oral Presentation

When & Where

09:15 AM
Jordan Hall 170