22. Physiological and Cognitive Effects of Sleep Deprivation on the Perception of Cold Stimuli and Pressure Stimuli

Haleigh Kelly Hanover College
Faculty Sponsor(s): Molly Winke Hanover College
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD), partial sleep deprivation (PSD), and the restorative effect of napping on the perception of cold stimuli during the cold pressor test (CPT) and graded pulse pressure applied by a NormaTec compression sleeve. Four female college students completed four sessions, which included a familiarization trial and three sleep trials, prior to completing a CPT and a NormaTec compression sleeve test (NTCST). For the CPT, participants placed a hand in an ice-water bath for 3 minutes with pain ratings measured every 30 seconds. For the NTCST, participants placed a leg in a NormaTec compression sleeve for 15 minutes with pain ratings measured every 90 seconds. It was hypothesized that PSD and TSD would result in increased visual analog scale scores (VASS) compared to baseline VASS. It was hypothesized that pain sensitivity would be highest following the TSD trial. It was hypothesized that a 30-minute nap would decrease VASS back to baseline. Data collection indicates that pain perception is 3.08% greater in the PSD trial and 7.78% greater in the TSD trial compared to baseline for the CPT. Data collection indicates that pain perception is 12.17% greater in the PSD trial and 24.68% greater in the TSD trial compared to baseline for the NTCST. Post-nap data indicates that pain perception compared to baseline is 19.75% greater for the CPT and 3.8% greater for the NTCST. Data collection is continuing.
Pharmacy, Health Sciences, & Exercise Science
Poster Presentation

When & Where

Irwin Library Lower Level